Don’t Forget; You Get What You Pay For!

I was talking with a lady last week about the price of horses. She doesn’t own a horse, but heard people were practically giving them away. Apparently a friend of hers took a horse to the sale and it brought almost nothing. It is a pretty common occurrence in this economy. You can buy those four-legged animals that any four-year old child can tell you is a horse. But . . . . . . we see it a little differently than some folks.

The typical first time horse owner is concerned about the price paid for the horse and the color of the  halter. Once you have owned a number of horses, the price is viewed in a broader perspective. You still are concerned about how much you spend, but you remember the true price you pay. For instance, how much did that horse cost me when I add back in the emergency room visit, ambulance ride, and the missed week of work. How much did the horse cost me if the cost after I factor the repair to the truck door  where  he kicked in the side?  You get the point.

The value of a good, sound horse with manners and capable of being safely ridden is worth a lot more than just what you  gave the sale barn. I lost count over the years of the people I have known that stopped riding within a month of purchasing their first horse. Some rode for a couple of years riding well-trained horses of others or some stable. But when they took that deal too good to pass up, they unfortunately  “got what they paid for! ”

To our way of thinking, you either buy a horse to ride or you want it for a pasture ornament. Nothing wrong with decorating the pasture, but it’s  probably not  the reason you gave your spouse when you wrote  the check.

If you have never owned a horse and thinking about the first one, do your homework BEFORE you buy.  Find a reputable place to buy it. Make sure you can ride it. Go back several times, don’t buy on an impulse. Ignore the urge to find a pretty one. It is far less expensive and a lot safer to get right the first time!

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